NewSQL is coming

July 13, 2011 · Posted in Development 

This post highlights some ideas  of database pioneer Michael Stonebraker about MySQL, old SQL and NoSQL from this article.

 

Why old SQL is bad for startups?

The widely accepted problem with MySQL is that it wasn’t built for webscale applications or those that must handle excessive transaction volumes.

Stonebraker said the problem with MySQL and other SQL databases is that they consume too many resources for overhead tasks (e.g., maintaining ACID compliance and handling multithreading) and relatively few on actually finding and serving data. This might be fine for a small application with a small data set, but it quickly becomes too much to handle as data and transaction volumes grow.

In Stonebraker’s opinion, “old SQL (as he calls it) is good for nothing” and needs to be “sent to the home for retired software.”

When web startups decide they need to build a product in a hurry, MySQL is natural choice.

 

Why NoSQL is not good?

There have been various attempts to overcome SQL’s performance and scalability problems, including the buzzworthy NoSQL movement that burst onto the scene a couple of years ago. However, it was quickly discovered that while NoSQL might be faster and scale better, it did so at the expense of ACID consistency.

Stonebraker thinks sacrificing ACID is a “terrible idea,” and, he noted, NoSQL databases end up only being marginally faster because they require writing certain consistency and other functions into the application’s business logic.

Stonebraker added, though, that NoSQL is a fine option for storing and serving unstructured or semi-structured data such as documents, which aren’t really suitable for relational databases. Facebook, for example, created Cassandra for certain tasks and also uses the Hadoop-based HBase heavily, but it’s still a MySQL shop for much of its core needs.

 

Read more:

RDBMSs vs. NoSQL Databases: Overview,

Differences between “NoSQL” databases: Cassandra vs MongoDB vs CouchDB vs Redis vs Riak vs HBase vs Membase vs Neo4j.

‘NewSQL’ ?

NewSQL is a term coined by 451 Group analyst Matthew Aslett or scalable SQL.

Pushed by companies such as Xeround, Clustrix, NimbusDB, GenieDB and Stonebraker’s own VoltDB, NewSQL products maintain ACID properties while eliminating most of the other functions that slow legacy SQL performance. VoltDB, an online-transaction processing (OLTP) database, utilizes a number of methods to improve speed, including by running entirely in-memory instead of on disk.

Perhaps NewSQL will help the next generation of web startups avoid falling into the pitfalls of their predecessors. Until, that is, it, too, becomes a relic of the Web 3.0 era.

 

 

Read more:

http://gigaom.com/cloud/facebook-trapped-in-mysql-fate-worse-than-death/

 

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